Start Making $400 Monthly As A Student

What Do I Do Online?


How To Be Making $400+ Monthly As A Student

I’m a student, and many of my readers are too. Even our readers who are no longer students are also interested in making money online. 
Last month alone,  I made $982 online, doing so many things. This might be too small for some people, like Harsh Agrawal of ShoutMeLoud.com who makes above $50,000 monthly. Converting it to Naira, it was a total of  354 thousand Naira (based on the present conversion rate)  
I didn’t have to leave my house to work under any boss, of course  I’m a student. I only subscribed my modem and that was my only investment. I didn’t even run Facebook and Twitter ads as I normally did, and that was why I didn’t make much. Moreover my academics were too occupying that I hardly had more than  2 hours a day on my laptop. At the end of everything, I landed in  two hundred and nine thousand Naira!  
I can’t share my account balance because it’s not that necessary, most internet marketers don’t do that.I’m not a Yahoo boy but I live better than most of them. Judging from the spiritual and emotional repercussions of their actions, you’d see that they are really in a mess. I just do some pretty petty jobs online and at the end of the month I get amazing $$$ in my bank account.  

How To Be Making $400+ Monthly As A Student



I do so many things online. I’d share some of them below:  
–  Blogging
I’m a blogger, at least for a year now I’ve been blogging. I have over four blogs but I’d share only three. You can check them up:  Reporter 247,  Know  Info Guide Africa and  Afra Tales.  
If you check  Afra Tales, you will not see any AdSense. Does that mean that I’m not making any $$$ from it? Well, we all are blogging for money, so I should have sold it off if it was not my business. That blog, without AdSense makes me  minimum $20 a week. It’s the lowest among all my blog earnings because I put the lowest interest in it. You can even check to see when last I updated it. The rest make  two times the first. When I check how much I make from my blogs, they reach  $700 a month, that’s about  252, 350. However, I co-partner on them. 

2.  I’m a freelancer
I write for people and get paid. Some of my clients pay as high as  $10 for a 450-500 words article, some pay as low as $3, but I always avoid the later. I always tell my students that anything you can do can pay you for life and I mean it. I even included a bonus e-book,  Actualizing Your Dreams As A Freelancer, where I enlisted almost everything you need to know about freelancing. I even included a website that will pay you  $100 (about N35, 000) for each of your articles they accept.  
They are out to encourage writers but not everyone has heard about them. I put it down in my bonus e-book too.  

3.  Graphics designs:  
I don’t do this but my twin does. A simple logo, made with Corel Draw can land  you $30. The sweetest part is that it takes less than one hour to complete this. Imagine making ten graphics designs a week, you don’t even need to work again. That’s something more than $250, and that’s around  90, 000 in a week
How many civil servants make that in a month? The only problem is that you might not be able to find a buyer. That implies that your designs are all left to you, and you make no money with it. I have given out some easy tips to help you sell out yourself and make the real $$$. 

4.  E-books
This is the sweetest of all my money making methods. My e-books have  sold as high as $50 per copy and as low as $0.99, depending on the demand and the volume of the e-book. E-books on health, relationship and money making tips make the biggest sells. However, I have seen people whose e-books sell only 2 copies, and that’s very discouraging.  

5.  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc
In September  I made $280 from my Facebook account. That is slightly above 100,000 Naira just to chat. I don’t even have more than two thousand friends in the account. My Twitter, with just 10,000 followers makes me about $20 a month. When I put my interest in Twitter and get up to 100,000 followers, you know what I’d be making.  
You shouldn’t still be wondering how Justin Bieber, Barack Obama and other top influencers make so much amount of money from their influence after reading this e-book. That your Instagram account can be paying your bills.  

6.  Website Creation and Designs
I’m not yet a guru in this but I created all my sites…Lol. I also create for people and get paid, but it’s only blogs anyways. If you can master other types of websites, then you should say good-bye to hunger for life. I’m too occupied to start this fully, but if you’re interested, then you can turn it into a career. 

7.  Other things
Many other things such as selling of your photos, writing e-books for people and so on can help you land your desired $$$ in a month. I have an Indian friend who makes minimum $6,000 in a month. That is something close to  2,163,000. He has been dodging telling me his secrets and I’m yet to find them out. How many civil servants and graduates can boast of up to  50,000 monthly?  

That is the level which Nigeria has fallen to. We cannot fall with Nigeria.  
People are taking advantages of these falls in dollar rate to make more Naira than they ever made. Imagine getting paid in dollars, when you convert them you know what it means.  

I have my students who are already making close to N70, 000 from the simple wealth tips I taught them. A graduate had to quit his job when he discovered that he could make more than $500 from his laptop.  
Everyday you wake up, you pick up your laptop, do some petty jobs and get the money. 

I want to teach you to be self reliant too.


Yes, the prayer of every teacher is for his student to be greater than him.  The sky is too big to contain us all. Every bird can fly comfortably.  
What do I mean,  we all can be making more than  500,000 a month from the internet and yet it will not be saturated. Everyone can be a wealth blogger yet the new ones will not lack. 

My third blog made me it’s first $50 less than three weeks after launching it. It doesn’t matter how long you have blogged, it doesn’t matter how long you have hustled online,  you can land your first $200 this month.  

I have penned down the 20 Killer Tips That Can Land You A Comfortable Internet Career In A 72 Page E-book

I named it  Making Millions In Your Dark Room because it’s all about that.  
The e-book is covering the following topics: 

– Freelance Writing /Content Creation 
– Test Websites & Apps 
– Create A Niche Website/Website Flipping 
– Website Publishing 
– Email Marketing 
– Selling Your Stuff Online i.e. CafePress 
– Cartoon & Video Creation/YouTube 
– Editing/Translating 
– Graphics Designing/Logo Creation 
– Search Engine Optimization [ie SEO] 
– App creation 
– Customer Service 
– Social Network/Forum Creation 
– Social Media Advertising [e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram] 
– Social Media Manager 
– Ethical Hacking 
– Blogging & Affiliate Marketing 
– Tutor Students 
–  Extras [how to get above 5,000 Instagram, Facebook and Twitter followers + likes [which you can then sell for money],  how to get AdSense approval without stress, how to get a 100,000 Facebook group members, etc]. You’ll also get access to our after sales coaching on making money online for a month. 

…and as I promised, a bonus e-book, Actualizing Your Dreams As A Freelancer. I have covered some major tips to  land you over $200 a month from freelance writing in this 24-page guide.  

The two e-books are on sale on Gumroad for $9.99 and $0.99 each. However, I have added the later as a bonus to the buyers of the first, so that you pay only $9.99.  

Depositor’s Guide: Ten quick things to know about Skye Bank takeover

85% Of mad people in Nigeria are youth-medical doctor

A Medical Doctor, Dr Aliyu Abubakar of Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria, has said that the youths account for over 85 per cent of mad people in Nigeria.
Abubakar made the remark in a paper he presented at a sensitisation workshop for youths organised by Bizara Youth Development Association in Zaria Local Government Area of Kaduna State entitled: “Drug Abuse in Nigeria: Causes, Effects and Solutions.”
He said:-
“According to a recent study, 85 per cent of mad people in Nigeria are youths within the age bracket of 18-38 years.
The major cause of mental challenge in Nigeria has gone beyond drug-abuse as the youths now inhale lizard feces, putting their noses into pit toilets, smoking matches, smoking dried horse feces and mixing lizard feces with dye powder.
Drug abuse disorder is a common problem affecting about 5 per cent of the of the world population with an estimated 10.2 per cent in the USA.”
He recalled that in Nigeria, it was recently reported that about three million bottles of cough syrup containing codeine is consumed daily in Kano State and about six million bottles consumed in the North-West. Abubakar added that in 2016, the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency reported that about 40 per cent of Nigerian youths engaged in drug-abuse.
The medical doctor stressed that the consequences of drug-abuse include mental disorder, liver cirrhosis, lethargy and cardiovascular disorder among others.
Abubakar added that those abusing drugs mostly drop out of school, engage in cultism, violence, arm-robbery, thuggery, rape,
lawlessness, murders and are culturally disorientated.

Textbook calls cancer a ‘disease of choice’ — and it’s required reading for UNC students | News & Observer

Undergraduates at UNC are required to take a one credit hour course called Lifetime Fitness. Chris Seward
A textbook for a required fitness class at UNC-Chapel Hill calls cancer a disease of choice, describes a theory that Holocaust victims failed to tap into their inner strength and maintains that “many if not most women” who are obsessed with weight have become habitual dieters.

The online textbook, “21st Century Wellness,” also includes standard information about fitness, nutrition and health. It is read by students in a one-credit hour course called Lifetime Fitness, required of all undergraduates at UNC. Each year, nearly 5,000 undergraduates take the class, which is aimed at teaching students about healthy lifestyles while incorporating a physical activity such as tennis, soccer or running.

Skye Golann, who graduated from UNC in May, took the class in the fall of 2017. He made an A, and said he enjoyed the physical activity twice a week as part of the class.

But he said the online course reading materials were “beyond bad.” He said he would sometimes read his girlfriend passages of “the craziest thing I found in the book that week.”

Golann said the book gives short shrift to genetic or societal factors that affect people’s health — for example, a lack of access to health care and good nutrition for many lower-income people. “There’s an extreme emphasis on personal responsibility that pretty much explicitly blames people in poor health,” he said, “which I thought was very problematic.”

Calling cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular problems diseases of choice goes too far, Golann said.

“Who doesn’t know someone who is a survivor or someone who died of cancer?” Golann added. “I remember thinking about, reading it — we have a huge cancer hospital less than a mile away.”

Positive thinking and natural choices
The book was written by two professors of exercise science at Brigham Young University, including Barbara Lockhart, a former Olympic speedskater who has taught mind/body integration, according to biographical information of the authors. The book explores the power of positive thinking, traditional Chinese medicine and making natural choices about health, as opposed to “surgery, drugs, or other means to achieve your desired ends.”

Christopher Johnson, the developer of the online course as part of a company called Bearface Instructional Technologies, said the information was peer reviewed by professors across the nation and by UNC faculty before the course book adoption.

Johnson left the publisher’s parent company, Indianapolis-based Perceivant, last year and formed a new higher education technology startup. He acknowledged that there had been some negative feedback about some elements of the book, but said scientific evidence backs up information that personal choices such as smoking, drug use and poor nutrition create risk factors for disease.

“Nowhere do we make character judgments,” Johnson said. “In fact, one of the approaches of the book is to really help students understand to build a sense of intrinsic motivation, that they need to get their source of energy and value from within, and not to say, because you’re overweight you’re not a good person. … In our society today, the diseases that kill most people — a vast majority are because of people’s behaviors.”

UNC adopted the online course materials a few years ago, said Darin Padua, chair of exercise and sport science, though the Lifetime Fitness course has been in existence for nearly 15 years.

Lifetime Fitness replaced the university’s required traditional physical activity courses. Padua said the change was made to give students more of an education on fitness and healthy living, as opposed to one standalone sports class that would be less likely to have a long-term benefit for students.

The course modules revolve around basic themes of how to have a healthy lifestyle, including cardiovascular fitness, muscles, endurance and strength, flexibility, nutrition and weight management, Padua said.

He said UNC seeks student reviews on its classes, and the strengths and weaknesses of how the content is presented.

“Each year we get feedback and we try to keep things updated as information changes,” Padua said, adding, “We work with the publishing group, Bearface, to make modifications on a regular basis.”

‘You’re going to definitely get criticisms’
“When you’re having over a thousand students through a course each year, you’re going to definitely get criticisms, and we take those very seriously because we want to make sure we’re providing the best educational content out there,” he said.

Padua said he wasn’t familiar with specific passages that the student critic mentioned and could not speak to them. But he said he would take a look at it.“Everyone realizes that there are a lot of factors that are related to disease, and it’s not a personal choice,” he added. “People have opportunities to maintain a healthy lifestyle but there are certain things that set people up to make that more difficult, for sure, based upon their surroundings and the environment and genetics.”

Online courseware is big business, and large publishing firms are racing to develop interactive materials to replace or supplement textbooks. Perceivant sells its health and fitness courseware to 14 universities, including Arizona State, Ohio State, Kennesaw State and Brigham Young universities. Its website includes a case study on UNC’s Lifetime Fitness class, and features the UNC logo along with those of other universities.

In a 2014 promotional video, Johnson said the firm wanted to grow revenue aggressively. That year, the company had $1 million in revenue but aimed for $36 million by this year, if it could spread the courses to 200 campuses. “Because faculty make the textbook adoption decision and students are required to make the purchase, we need to target the individual faculty who control the largest adoption programs,” he said in the video.

Not ‘one size fits all’
Joel Davis, director of collegiate partnerships at Perceivant, said the company has structured its contracts with authors to allow for customization based on each university’s needs. So, for example, at Kennesaw State in Georgia, the “21st Century Wellness” book was altered, with nine chapters written by the school’s own faculty and the other eight chapters from the original authors.

Davis said academic departments might view content and terminology differently.

“It’s not going to be a one size fits all,” Davis said. “Some people are going to not want this chapter but they’re going to want that chapter.”

Another advantage, Davis said, is that professors can monitor students’ engagement with the online class material and intervene if students appear to be in danger of failing. In UNC’s class, faculty can collect aggregated student data to see students’ fitness and learning outcomes.

The courses feature interactive elements, including a self assessment on fitness. Students can check their progress in the course, and they do the test at the end to see whether their fitness improved.

“It helps students understand, in a very personal way, how the academic content immediately impacted them,” Johnson said.

Johnson said the online course material is purchased for about $36 per student, much less than most textbooks. That includes the book, interactive software and other elements.

Golann said a required health class in college makes sense, and students want more information about mental health in particular. But UNC’s online course had the feel of a class outsourced to a private company. The content, he said, was not up to UNC’s standards.

“It is the only required textbook that every UNC student has to take,” he said. “At graduation, this is the only book that everyone’s supposedly read.”

Jane Stancill: 919-829-4559, @janestancill

Excerpts from ‘21st Century Wellness’
“While enduring the atrocities of the concentration camps in World War II, Victor Frankl developed his school of psychotherapy, which he called logotherapy. He realized deep down that his life had meaning no matter how inhumanely he was being treated by his captors. The people in the camps who did not tap into the strength that comes from recognizing their intrinsic worth succumbed to the brutality to which they were subjected. They gave up or felt they were not deserving of being treated better. After surviving the camps, Frankl taught that every life has meaning and it is up to each person to discover and believe in that meaning.”

“Physicists and biologists speak of coherence, the integration of vast amounts of complex activities within a system, whether the whole universe or the human being. We feel this phenomenon of coherence when our heart, mind and body are aligned. It gives us a feeling of wholeness, feeling connected within ourselves. This feeling can transcend to others, feeling a oneness with others, or even to the earth or the cosmos, feeling a oneness with life.”

“There are many hundreds of research studies that have been published on the health-related benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness and a physically active lifestyle. Most of these health benefits come in the form of reducing risk of chronic diseases that are both physical and mental in nature. Some experts have begun calling these diseases diseases of choice because how we choose to live, in large part, determines the risk of being diagnosed with disease like heart disease, cancer, dementia, and others.”

“The therapeutic versus eugenic argument can be applied to your choices for healthy living. Will you choose to take a natural approach to living a prudent lifestyle focusing on being physically active, eating well, getting enough sleep, avoiding tobacco and so forth? Will you choose to use options other than these natural paths such as surgery, drugs, or other means to achieve your desired ends? Our intent is to provide you not only with the knowledge but also the context for making these choices so that you are aware of the potential benefits or detrimental consequences of your choices.”

“Thinking positively about yourself and others and reducing negativity in your life will work like a magnet helping to attract more positive people and things into your life.”

“When obsessed with weight, many if not most women and some men have become habitual dieters. A restriction in the amount of food eaten may result in an immediate weight loss; however, it also puts the body into a ‘survival mode’ characterized by a reduction in metabolism.”

Undergraduates at UNC are required to take a one credit hour course called Lifetime Fitness. Chris Seward
A textbook for a required fitness class at UNC-Chapel Hill calls cancer a disease of choice, describes a theory that Holocaust victims failed to tap into their inner strength and maintains that “many if not most women” who are obsessed with weight have become habitual dieters.

The online textbook, “21st Century Wellness,” also includes standard information about fitness, nutrition and health. It is read by students in a one-credit hour course called Lifetime Fitness, required of all undergraduates at UNC. Each year, nearly 5,000 undergraduates take the class, which is aimed at teaching students about healthy lifestyles while incorporating a physical activity such as tennis, soccer or running.

Skye Golann, who graduated from UNC in May, took the class in the fall of 2017. He made an A, and said he enjoyed the physical activity twice a week as part of the class.

But he said the online course reading materials were “beyond bad.” He said he would sometimes read his girlfriend passages of “the craziest thing I found in the book that week.”

Golann said the book gives short shrift to genetic or societal factors that affect people’s health — for example, a lack of access to health care and good nutrition for many lower-income people. “There’s an extreme emphasis on personal responsibility that pretty much explicitly blames people in poor health,” he said, “which I thought was very problematic.”

Calling cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular problems diseases of choice goes too far, Golann said.

“Who doesn’t know someone who is a survivor or someone who died of cancer?” Golann added. “I remember thinking about, reading it — we have a huge cancer hospital less than a mile away.”

Positive thinking and natural choices
The book was written by two professors of exercise science at Brigham Young University, including Barbara Lockhart, a former Olympic speedskater who has taught mind/body integration, according to biographical information of the authors. The book explores the power of positive thinking, traditional Chinese medicine and making natural choices about health, as opposed to “surgery, drugs, or other means to achieve your desired ends.”

Christopher Johnson, the developer of the online course as part of a company called Bearface Instructional Technologies, said the information was peer reviewed by professors across the nation and by UNC faculty before the course book adoption.

Johnson left the publisher’s parent company, Indianapolis-based Perceivant, last year and formed a new higher education technology startup. He acknowledged that there had been some negative feedback about some elements of the book, but said scientific evidence backs up information that personal choices such as smoking, drug use and poor nutrition create risk factors for disease.

“Nowhere do we make character judgments,” Johnson said. “In fact, one of the approaches of the book is to really help students understand to build a sense of intrinsic motivation, that they need to get their source of energy and value from within, and not to say, because you’re overweight you’re not a good person. … In our society today, the diseases that kill most people — a vast majority are because of people’s behaviors.”

UNC adopted the online course materials a few years ago, said Darin Padua, chair of exercise and sport science, though the Lifetime Fitness course has been in existence for nearly 15 years.

Lifetime Fitness replaced the university’s required traditional physical activity courses. Padua said the change was made to give students more of an education on fitness and healthy living, as opposed to one standalone sports class that would be less likely to have a long-term benefit for students.

The course modules revolve around basic themes of how to have a healthy lifestyle, including cardiovascular fitness, muscles, endurance and strength, flexibility, nutrition and weight management, Padua said.

He said UNC seeks student reviews on its classes, and the strengths and weaknesses of how the content is presented.

“Each year we get feedback and we try to keep things updated as information changes,” Padua said, adding, “We work with the publishing group, Bearface, to make modifications on a regular basis.”

‘You’re going to definitely get criticisms’
“When you’re having over a thousand students through a course each year, you’re going to definitely get criticisms, and we take those very seriously because we want to make sure we’re providing the best educational content out there,” he said.

Padua said he wasn’t familiar with specific passages that the student critic mentioned and could not speak to them. But he said he would take a look at it.“Everyone realizes that there are a lot of factors that are related to disease, and it’s not a personal choice,” he added. “People have opportunities to maintain a healthy lifestyle but there are certain things that set people up to make that more difficult, for sure, based upon their surroundings and the environment and genetics.”

Online courseware is big business, and large publishing firms are racing to develop interactive materials to replace or supplement textbooks. Perceivant sells its health and fitness courseware to 14 universities, including Arizona State, Ohio State, Kennesaw State and Brigham Young universities. Its website includes a case study on UNC’s Lifetime Fitness class, and features the UNC logo along with those of other universities.

In a 2014 promotional video, Johnson said the firm wanted to grow revenue aggressively. That year, the company had $1 million in revenue but aimed for $36 million by this year, if it could spread the courses to 200 campuses. “Because faculty make the textbook adoption decision and students are required to make the purchase, we need to target the individual faculty who control the largest adoption programs,” he said in the video.

Not ‘one size fits all’
Joel Davis, director of collegiate partnerships at Perceivant, said the company has structured its contracts with authors to allow for customization based on each university’s needs. So, for example, at Kennesaw State in Georgia, the “21st Century Wellness” book was altered, with nine chapters written by the school’s own faculty and the other eight chapters from the original authors.

Davis said academic departments might view content and terminology differently.

“It’s not going to be a one size fits all,” Davis said. “Some people are going to not want this chapter but they’re going to want that chapter.”

Another advantage, Davis said, is that professors can monitor students’ engagement with the online class material and intervene if students appear to be in danger of failing. In UNC’s class, faculty can collect aggregated student data to see students’ fitness and learning outcomes.

The courses feature interactive elements, including a self assessment on fitness. Students can check their progress in the course, and they do the test at the end to see whether their fitness improved.

“It helps students understand, in a very personal way, how the academic content immediately impacted them,” Johnson said.

Johnson said the online course material is purchased for about $36 per student, much less than most textbooks. That includes the book, interactive software and other elements.

Golann said a required health class in college makes sense, and students want more information about mental health in particular. But UNC’s online course had the feel of a class outsourced to a private company. The content, he said, was not up to UNC’s standards.

“It is the only required textbook that every UNC student has to take,” he said. “At graduation, this is the only book that everyone’s supposedly read.”

Jane Stancill: 919-829-4559, @janestancill

Excerpts from ‘21st Century Wellness’
“While enduring the atrocities of the concentration camps in World War II, Victor Frankl developed his school of psychotherapy, which he called logotherapy. He realized deep down that his life had meaning no matter how inhumanely he was being treated by his captors. The people in the camps who did not tap into the strength that comes from recognizing their intrinsic worth succumbed to the brutality to which they were subjected. They gave up or felt they were not deserving of being treated better. After surviving the camps, Frankl taught that every life has meaning and it is up to each person to discover and believe in that meaning.”

“Physicists and biologists speak of coherence, the integration of vast amounts of complex activities within a system, whether the whole universe or the human being. We feel this phenomenon of coherence when our heart, mind and body are aligned. It gives us a feeling of wholeness, feeling connected within ourselves. This feeling can transcend to others, feeling a oneness with others, or even to the earth or the cosmos, feeling a oneness with life.”

“There are many hundreds of research studies that have been published on the health-related benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness and a physically active lifestyle. Most of these health benefits come in the form of reducing risk of chronic diseases that are both physical and mental in nature. Some experts have begun calling these diseases diseases of choice because how we choose to live, in large part, determines the risk of being diagnosed with disease like heart disease, cancer, dementia, and others.”

“The therapeutic versus eugenic argument can be applied to your choices for healthy living. Will you choose to take a natural approach to living a prudent lifestyle focusing on being physically active, eating well, getting enough sleep, avoiding tobacco and so forth? Will you choose to use options other than these natural paths such as surgery, drugs, or other means to achieve your desired ends? Our intent is to provide you not only with the knowledge but also the context for making these choices so that you are aware of the potential benefits or detrimental consequences of your choices.”

“Thinking positively about yourself and others and reducing negativity in your life will work like a magnet helping to attract more positive people and things into your life.”

“When obsessed with weight, many if not most women and some men have become habitual dieters. A restriction in the amount of food eaten may result in an immediate weight loss; however, it also puts the body into a ‘survival mode’ characterized by a reduction in metabolism.”

Trump Delivers $267 Billion Trade Escalation Out Of The Clear Blue Sky (Figuratively and Literally)


Donald Trump apparently wasn’t satisfied that people were worried enough about the prospect of tariffs on an additional $200 billion in Chinese goods.

As a reminder, the public comment period on the proposed next round of duties expired on Thursday and suffice to say the administration has been warned. Tech companies including Cisco and HP sent letters to the USTR on Thursday as the comment period lapsed. Other correspondence sent to Robert Lighthizer stressed that small and medium-sized enterprises as well as manufacturers are struggling to adapt to the new trade regime and won’t be nimble enough the deftly navigate the increasingly choppy waters in which global supply chains are being disrupted.

The problem, for the hundredth time, is that in addition to the threat the trade frictions pose to global growth (and, implicitly, to developing economies), the next round of tariffs on Chinese imports will invariably drive up prices on consumer goods in the U.S., potentially setting the stage for more inflation pressure and a more hawkish Fed.

Read more

The imposition of levies on an additional $200 billion in Chinese goods will immediately be met with retaliation from Beijing in the form of differentiated duties on $60 billion in U.S. products.

The question mark around the next escalation between Washington and Beijing relates to whether Trump will opt for a 25% duty or a 10% levy. There’s a ton more on that here, but the bottom line is that the higher the tariff rate, the more upside risk for inflation and the more downside for risk assets.

On Friday, Trump added another question mark.

While speaking to reporters aboard Air Force One, the President indicated that he may slap tariffs on another $267 billion in Chinese goods on top of the prospective duties on $200 billion in products. There’s no readily discernible reason why he would have said that today and given that his comments came while aboard the presidential jet, this latest escalation comes out of the clear blue sky, both figuratively and literally.

Here is the actual quote:

I hate to do this, but behind [the $200 billion] there is another $267 billion ready to go on short notice if I want.

That hypothetical second tranche would bring the total amount of Chinese goods taxed to around $500 billion (the initial duties on $50 billion in goods that were implemented in two steps on July 6 and August 23 + tariffs on $200 billion more expected this month + this new threat against $264 billion in items). That’s consistent with Trump’s “I’ll go to $500 billion” rhetoric from July.

Still unanswered is what the rate would be (i.e. 10% or 25%) and also up for grabs is whether he’s even serious at this point or whether he’s just saying whatever pops into his head while cruising around on a plane on the way another to one of his MAGA rallies in Fargo, where he’ll try to help raise cash for GOP Rep. Kevin Cramer’s Senate race (in the interest of accuracy, it’s actually not a rally, it’s a private fundraiser).

Read more on Cramer

Earlier today, Larry Kudlow made the media rounds, and here’s what he had to say about the tariffs, when pressed by Bloomberg:

He made similar comments to CNBC.

Trump’s new threats lend still more credence to the notion that this administration really has no intention of deescalating this situation. Trump needs battles to fight and windmills at which to tilt, especially in light of the fact that the tariffs are starting to hit home for folks in the farm belt.

There’s a narrative out there that says Trump “needs” or “wants” wins on trade ahead of the midterms. I continue to think that’s the wrong way to look at things. Trump needs, more than anything, an excuse to fire up his base and that base cares far more about finding confirmation bias for their misguided belief that globalism and nefarious foreigners are responsible for the decline of flyover America than they do about reality and actual results.